Ghost stories

hymies halloweenDon’t forget to stop by Hymie’s this week and pick up your copy of our first ever Halloween mix CD — Twenty-five tracks of terror starring vampires, werewolves, zombies and other spooky characters.

There’s also fun bits from story records interspersed throughout. It’s a fun soundtrack for Friday evening, while you’re watching the trick or treaters come and go.

tell tale heart

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“The Tell Tale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe, performed by James Mason

monkeys paw

George Rose reads W.W. Jacobs’ 1902 story, “The Monkey’s Paw.”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

When Charlie Parr was set to release his LP Barnswallow with a two-night stand at the Cedar Cultural Center, he wanted to talk about something else in this interview with City Pages — specifically cooking food on the manifold of a car.

We remembered that story when we heard Charlie’s song on this double-disc/triple-LP compilation out next month, While No One Was Looking: Toasting Twenty Years of Bloodshot Records. His cover of “Manifold” by Devil in a Woodpile is one of thirty-seven tracks on the epic set — all kinds of people performed songs from the Bloodshot catalog, from Superchunk (“Come Pick Me Up”) to Chuck Prophet (Andre Williams’ awesome song “Dirt” from Hoods & Shades). There’s even a cover of “East Jefferson” by our friend Ben Weaver, but Charlie’s song was our favorite.
while no one was looking

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Waiting

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Waiting Room”

fugazi-first-demoWe’ve been waiting since 2001 for a new Fugazi record, and it looks like it will be a little longer still. As a consolation, Dischord Records is releasing First Demos next month, eleven songs the band recorded in 1988 before their first tour. Early versions of “Waiting Room” and “Merchandise” appear — as well as the first recording of “Furniture,” a song which was their last new single thirteen years ago.

Its possible you have already heard these songs if you love this band as much as we do. These were the first things we listened to when we learned you could find free music on the internet. The copy you can easily find online is made from the band’s tour cassette, which they encouraged people to share at the time. Presumably this reissue will sound as good as the other remastered releases Dischord has been putting out.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Even Trolls Love Rock and Roll” by Tony Joe White

hymies halloweenCome by the record shop this week for a copy of our first ever Halloween mix CD. Twenty-five spooky tracks featuring trolls, skeletons, witches, ghosts and zombies — interspersed throughout are clips from our kids records featuring even more monsters, ghouls and other creatures of the night!

Free with purchase while they last!

You might have read in this morning’s paper that Jack Bruce, the bassist for blues/rock trio Cream, passed away this weekend at 71. Here’s the New York Times story.

Bruce was the band’s lead singer and co-wrote many of their best songs, including “Sunshine of Your Love,” “I Feel Free” and “Politician.” We always liked Bruce’s original songs more than the extended jams the band did on blues standards.

Bruce also played bass on the Blind Faith album, and with Tony William’s Lifetime. He recorded a jazz album, Things We Like, after leaving Cream, but it was shelved by the label until they released his more rock-oriented solo debut, Songs for a Tailor. During this time he also appeared on Frank Zappa’s Apostrophe(‘), sharing credit for the title jam, and lent his distinctive style to Lou Reed’s Berlin. The most recent of his many solo albums came out earlier this year — still, Bruce is likely best remembered for his work with Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker in Cream.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Sunshine of Your Love”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“I Feel Free”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“We Don’t Break Bread” by the Brian Just Band

We first posted this song three years ago, but its still a favorite. When we first shared the Brian Just Band‘s album If You Want to be Alone or If You Need to be With Someone, we were enchanted by its bright, springtime sound — something Brian pointed out was a misunderstanding.

Listening to it this mid-autumn morning, on a day where we’ll try to make time to clean up the garden a little more while keeping up with everything going on in the record shop, we understand what he meant.

Saturdays are great days here — lots of friends who can’t visit during the week stop by. Several great collections of used records have been added to the stacks out there, so they’re sure to find something special.

One more song by the Brian Just Band, the first one on their more recent disc, Enlightenment.

By the way, you catch them, along with Brian Laidlaw & the Family Trade, on November 1st at Harriet Brewing‘s Tap Room.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Maybe”

Fritz Kreisler

Classical musicians are not A-list celebrities today, but that was not always the case. If you think of the total span of recorded music, from the earliest commercial recordings of the late 1870s to the present, classical music was for the first half one of the most popular genres.

Fritz Kreisler is one of our favorite classical performers from that period — his recorded range from 1915 to 1950, and due to his popularity were pretty widely re-issued on LP and now on CD.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Gypsy Andante” by Fritz Kreisler

Kreisler was half-Jewish but a convert to Catholicism, and had been baptized at twelve. He served as an officer in the Austrian army early in World War I, but was quickly wounded and honorably discharged (his recollection of this time was published as Four Weeks in the Trenches: The War Story of a Violinist). During both World Wars he settled safely in the United States, making New York his home and becoming an American citizen in 1943.

Between the wars Kreisler was one of the most distinguished and influential musicians in the United States and Europe. His tone was expressive and instantly recognizable, and his interpretations highly personal, as reflected in the original works for which he is probably best remembered today.

His own compositions were often pistaches of the composers he most admired, from Beethoven and Brahms to Italian opera composers like Paganini. Kreisler adapted Paganini’s D major violin concerto, a showpiece for a re-tuned violin in the hands of a virtuoso, for a 1936 recording with Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra. Around this same time he revealed that many of his transcriptions of early works were in fact his own compositions, much to the chagrin of critics who hadn’t seen through the ruse. Many of these original pieces were popular encores, before and after this time, especially “Liebesfreud”:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

kreisler

His later life in New York was marred by two automobile accidents, leading to poor health which limited his performing and recording. By this time his concerts consisted largely of his own material, and his repertoire was restricted. Regardless, he remained enormously popular. He made his last recordings in 1950, and passed away twelve years later at the age of eighty-six. Kreisler was interred in Brooklyn’s Woodlawn Cemetery, where one might also pay homage to many jazz legends, including Duke Ellington, Max Roach and Miles Davis.

In his lifetime, Kreisler owned and played a number of legendary violins, including ones made by Stradivarius and the Guarneris — some of those he owned are now named for him, including one now owned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

« Older entries

This site is protected by Comment SPAM Wiper.