Hugh Masekela

Monday’s snowstorm was the biggest here in Minneapolis since 2012. We were thrilled to have a snow day and spend it romping outside with our kids, except that there was also a lot of shoveling to do. Even Irene took the day off yesterday, which is very rare.

We haven’t had the snow piled so high on the sides of our shop since that 2012 snowstorm, and unfortunately the parking spaces on Lake Street haven’t been plowed very well. We’re hoping that improves today, but if not we’ll have to get out there and shovel some more.

Today’s main feature is a couple songs by South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela, who passed away this week at the age of seventy-eight.

Although he spent many years away from his homeland, Masekela’s music is indelibly marked by South Africa. He was twenty-one when he left in 1960, in part because being an anti-apartheid activist made him a target. He finally returned in 1990, after Nelson Mandela had been freed.

Masekela’s song “Bring Him Back Home” was a hit in 1987 and became an anthem of the anti-apartheid movement.

Masakela also had several pop hits in the U.S., notably the 1968 cowbell jam “Grazing in the Grass.”┬áHe recorded two hugely successful albums with Herb Alpert and also had a dance hit from his 1984 album Techno Bush. Our favorite of his nearly fifty albums is Introducing the Hedzoleh Soundz, the first of three albums he recorded with that group in Lagos, Nigeria during the middle 70s. Here are the first two tracks from that record, called “Languta” and “Kaa Ye Oya.” Masakela wrote the first song and members of Hedzoleh Soundz wrote the second.

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