Storytime

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slim goodbody

Presented by KRAFT!

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co star

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NARRATOR

Several months have passed. Although the emotional shock of her mother’s revelation was a severe one, Allison gradually recovered from it. She has gone to New York to make her way, if she can, as a writer.

Constance is now Mrs. Michael Rossi. This morning she is alone in her dress shop. A man in Navy uniform enters.

You are that man, Lieutenant John Adams.

Sound: Door closes behind you and Constance looks up.

CONSTANCE

Yes?

ADAMS

Are you Mrs. Constance Rossi?

CONSTANCE

Yes, I am.

ADAMS

Do you employ a girl named Selena Cross?

COSTANCE

Yes. Has anything happened to her?

ADAMS

I’m John Adams, Ma’am. Lieutenant, US Navy. I’m investigating the case of Seaman Lewis Cross, who’s been missing ever since last winter. I understand he was Selena Cross’s father.

CONSTANCE

Her stepfather.

ADAMS

They didn’t get along to well, did they?

CONSTANCE

Nobody got along well with Lucas Cross. He was shiftless and bad-tempered. A congenital drunk.

ADAMS

Did Selena ever talk to you about having any quarrels with him?

CONSTANCE

Do I have to answer these questions? Why don’t you ask Selena? I don’t like talking about her behind her back.

ADAMS

My partner is questioning her right now, ma’am, at her home.

CONSTANCE

So that’s why she didn’t come in this morning!

ADAMS

Yes ma’am. And you’re not talking about her behind her back. I told her I was coming to see you.

CONSTANCE

I see. Then let me tell you first that I’ve never known a sweeter, kinder girl than Selena.

ADAMS

She ever talk about having any fights with Lucas Cross?

CONSTANCE

Yes. She did.

ADAMS

When?

CONSTANCE

Oh, many times.

ADAMS

Any particular time?

CONSTANCE

Well, I remember one morning when she came in all black and blue from the beating that brute had given her. I’ve always maintained that’s what brought on her illness.

ADAMS

What illness?

CONSTANCE

She was operated on for an appendicitis soon after. And soon after that, Lucas Cross left town. Nobody here has seen him since.

ADAMS

From information we’ve collected — a driver who gave him a lift one night last winter — it appears he was coming back here on his last leave. But –
SOUND Telephone

CONSTANCE

Excuse me. (Picks up phone) Hello? Yes, this is Mrs. Rossi … Who? Oh, yes. He’s here … It’s for you, Lieutenant.

ADAMS

Thank you … Hello? Oh, hello Paul … What? … She has? Good Lord! … I’ll be right over.
SOUND Hang up phone receiver

CONSTANCE

What’s happened?

ADAMS

That was my partner. Selena Cross has just confessed to the murder of Lucas Cross.

CONSTANCE

Oh, no! Not Selena! Not Selena!
MUSIC Up and out

If you have enjoyed performing with Paullette Goddard in this scene from Peyton Place, we recommend you find a copy of Albert Brooks’ 1973 classic, Comedy Minus One, in which you must perform a classic routine with Mr. Brooks.

True story: Last winter we finally convinced my mother to give our kids the Star Wars guys from my childhood. They had spent most of my adult life in a JC Penny shirt box in my brother’s basement, and we’ll admit it’s been a little nerve-wracking to watch our four year old monster pummel them, bury them in sand, and contort them into horrible positions.

In the box of “guys” was an odd man out – a Black Hole action figure. Do you remember The Black Hole? If you do you’re my age, and you probably remember it as Disney’s creepy answer to Star Wars. My brother Paul and I loved it growing up, and somewhere along the way the movie went out of print and became forgotten to an entire generation. We suppose that’s why they never made a prequel.

So Gus was fascinated by this guy, who clearly didn’t belong. Who was this outcast?! We went to our neighborhood video store (which used to be a family-owned shop and is now a weirdly monolithic franchise) and, kids in tow, ask the clerk if they had The Black Hole.

“Is it a porno?” he asks.

“No, it’s a kids movie.”

And he checks the computer, only to find they don’t have it. We went home and watched the movie online. Learned a lesson about taking the kids to the video store, we guess. Also learned that we’re still afraid of Maximillan.

So the real highlight of today’s post is the Black Hole storybook record. Unlike the Star Wars records we’ve posted (here and here), this one has the film’s cast. It’s a great interpretation of the story, and it kind of captures the Buck Rogers radio program excitement. We really loved this album growing up, in part because it’s less weird than the movie. Here’s The Black Hole:

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Yesterday we posted for the first time a program we produced for KFAI’s Wave Project a few years back. Today’s rerun is a second program we produced this past August about one of our favorite composers and one of his most popular works.

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This program was inspired by the hundreds of recordings of Peter and the Wolf we see pass through the record shop. Some were very, very good, and others very, very bad. All were based on the same score written by Serge Prokofiev just after his return to the Soviet Union 1936. Our goal was to capture not only the enormous variety of interpretations, but also the world in which Prokofiev lived and performed, and the pressure he was under when he composed Peter and the Wolf. In all more than 150 LPs, 78s, 45s, cassettes and CDs were used in creating this program.

Peter images24

peter and the wolf

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Peter images18

Peter images20

In his own way Don Gillis brought the classical repertoire to millions of Americans. He was the producer for the NBC Symphony Orchestra during the long tenure of Arturo Toscanini, helping to broadcast hundreds of symphonic and operatic performances on radio and television (today you can buy an enormous, 85-disc box set of the complete recordings of Toscanini on RCA/Victor Records which including many with the NBC Symphony Orchestra).

After Toscanini retired in 1954 Gillis helped create the Symphony of the Air, which continued to broadcast orchestral music under the direction of Leopold Stokowski. Gillis was also an active composer when not busy with the office work of managing the Orchestra — He wrote ten symhonies (including the light-hearted Symphony No. 5 1/2 “A Symphony for Fun”), several concertos and quartets, and tone poems such as a celebration of the town where he grew up, Fort Worth, Texas (Portrait of a Frontier Town).

The Man Who Invented Music was written by Don Gillis for the U.S. Steel NBC Summer Symphony Series in 1949. It was debuted by Antal Dorati that August. Gillis conducted this recording himself, and it was narrated by Jack Kilty, a minor television star on, you guessed it, NBC.

the man who invented msic

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wilma

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Here at Hymie’s we love Halloween! We’re especially excited this year because we get to spin some of our favorite “monsta-billy” jams with Jack Klatt and the Cat Swingers at the Republic Bar. Expect a fun mixtures of ghost stories and spooky tunes from 9 to 11pm tonight.

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“Werewolf” by the Frantics

tell tale heart

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“the Tell Tale Heart” performed by James Mason

terror tales

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“Shipwreck” from Terror Tales by the Old Sea Hag

Patty from Jack’s band has been dating the old sea hag so she’s sure to make an appearance — Its sure to be a fun, monster-y evening all around. We have really enjoyed putting together awesome shows with the nice folks at the Republic & we hope we’ll all be on your trick-or-treat rounds tonight.

 

octoberrepublic

 

superman

The Adventures of Superman was introduced two years after Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created the “Man of Steel” for Action Comics #1 in 1938. The series’ dynamic opening is legendary, so deeply ingrained in popular culture it’s hard to imagine a time before nearly ever child in America could finish each line…

Faster than a speeding bullet.
More powerful than a locomotive.
Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.
Look! Up in the sky!
It’s a bird!
It’s a plane!
It’s Superman!

The 15 minute episodes ran three times for nearly ten years. One 1946 adventure had a powerful ripple effect, demonstrating the enormous potential influence of children’s media. The great human rights activist Stetson Kennedy collaborated with the program’s writers to have Superman take on the Ku Klux Klan — the sixteen episode story, “Clan of the Fiery Cross,” used genuine Klan rituals and code words provided by Kennedy, who had infiltrated the group in Georgia. It’s widely believed that the trivialization of the Klan’s secret rituals and codes diminished it’s mystique and recruitment potential. The authors of the 2005 book Freakonomics concluded that Kennedy’s work and his collaboration with Superman distinguish him as the single most influential figure in the fight against the Klan’s terrorism. We have never seen this story on an LP (this one in the picture has the Man of Steel taking on crooks who try to blow up a train), but you can hear it through the magic of internet archives here.

 

I read once that after Ulysses was published, Joyce’s wife Nora tossed a copy at him and asked, “Why don’t you write sensible books that people can read?”

ulysses

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Here, in two parts, is the first side of this album. If you want to hear side two you’ll have to submit a 1,000 word essay in an official Blue Book comparing Molly Bloom’s character to Penelope from Homer’s Odyssey. Please write in blue ink.

monkeys paw

George Rose reads W.W. Jacobs’ 1902 story, “The Monkey’s Paw.”

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