Playlists

You are currently browsing the archive for the Playlists category.

Mix tapes are awesome, but old mix tapes are the awesome-est because they give you a little peek into your past. Here’s an old one that was in the little 3-drawer cassette case in the office here at Hymie’s.

To make a mix tape for a friend you had to sit in front of your tape deck for ninety minutes, and you had to have a stack of your records all lined up — the fact that you couldn’t change the order like you can on a mix cd on your Itunes gave mix tapes an immediacy that’s much-missed. When your friend listened to it they had to enjoy it in the order you selected — they couldn’t skip a track even if they really, really didn’t like Flipper.

We’ve posted about Hymie’s own mix tapes (here). They’re an especially important relic around the shop, filled with amazing and sometimes goofy songs that he loved. A lot of Hymie’s tapes were from his collection of 78s, which is long-gone and spread all over the world.

Other past posts about mix tape treasures include this one about one of our all-time favorite cassettes, which was made by a friend who, like Hymie, is no longer with us. Having something like that helps keep a friend alive in your memory, even if the old conversations about music have to become one-sided. We wouldn’t trade that tape, or any of a number of a number like it, for the rarest record you could find. One thing we learned from the box of tapes we found in another friend’s garage (posted here) is that they might be sort of useless to most people, but priceless to the people who made them or received them.

Here’s a side from a mix tape in our office…

running mix

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Gotta Get Away” by Stiff Little Fingers

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Runaround” by the Undertones

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“1000000″ by REM

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Ha Ha Ha” by Flipper

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Pay to Cum” by Bad Brains

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Lowdown” by Wire

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Within your Reach” by the Replacements

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Love Vibrator” by Johnny Walker

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Why Can’t I Touch It?” by the Buzzcocks

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Sometimes Good Guys Don’t Wear White” by Minor Threat

Progressive rock is as decisive to rock listeners as jazz fusion is to jazz listeners — for some the seventies were a high point in rock history, where albums were given greater compositional and lyrical density and substance, while for others it was a period of pretentious excess, the very reason punk rock had to be invented.

We love so much of it, the side-length suites like “Atom Heart Mother” and “Close to the Edge,” the concept albums like Thick as a Brick, the virtuoso guitar performances of guys like Robert Fripp. Surely we’re not alone because the best progressive rock albums are reliably out of stock in any mostly-used record shop like ours.

But there are also some mind-numbingly boring progressive rock moments — and today’s collection could be extended for into a triple-post with a gatefold sleeve, in true 70s prog format. To quote Ian Anderson, we “really don’t mind if you sit this one out” because we’re going to listen to a few of them today. If you’re having a slow Monday this is probably not going to speed things up…

“Raconteur Troubadour” by Gentle Giant

pretentiousThe 1977 compilation of early Gentle Giant tracks we had in stock this week is titled Pretentious. The liner notes inside tell us the band hung a huge neon banner over the stage during an American tour that read “Pretentious” as a clever little ‘FU’ to their critics. This is a group that also released an album called Acquiring the Taste.

Gentle Giant is a band that never really had the ‘crossover’ success of other progressive groups who found singles and albums regularly on the charts during the genre’s golden era. “Raconteur Troubadour” from their album Octopus (supposed to be a pun on ‘octo opus,’ reflecting the album’s eight tracks — get it?) isn’t a fair representation of the band, which could often be as exciting and interesting as it was challenging — here they are just overwhelmingly boring.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Baker St. Muse” by Jethro Tull

minstrelUnlike Gentle Giant, Jethro Tull enjoyed enormous commercial success in the seventies — so much that by the time they recorded their seventh album (fifth to peak in Billboard’s top twenty), there’s a solid sense of resentment and fatigue coming from the “minstrel in the gallery.”

The darkest of Ian Anderson’s cynicism had previously been eased by his light-hearted troubadouring, a spoonful of sugar that made Tull’s most excessive, pretentious works entertaining.

Nowhere does Anderson wallow in weariness more than “Baker St. Muse,” a directionless near side-long suite that’s not only missing the memorable riffs of “Minstrel in the Gallery” and “Cold Wind to Valhalla” (both on the other side of the album) but the very thing that makes us love him so much: his unrelenting showmanship.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Kites by Jade Warrior

jade warrior kitesIn Jeff Smith’s comic book series Bone characters are put to sleep almost instantly every time the hero, Fone Bone, takes out his copy of Moby Dick and begins to read aloud — the same could be true for the liner notes to this 1976 album, exceeded in their oppressive pretentions by the music on the record. Its side-long suites range from spacy tedium to jarring string quartets (think Terry Reilly played overloud and quickly) to forced integrations of world music. According to Allmusic’s review of the album, the band — essentially just Tony Duhig and Jon Field augmented by a variety of guests for this outing — labored over Kites for nine months.

The same review actually contains the phrase “intense ambient sound.”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Song for America” by Kansas

kansasBefore Kansas hit the charts with the awesome anthems “Carry on my Wayward Son” and “Point of no Return,” they laid the groundwork for ‘cow-prog,’ an awkward little genre that’s never captured our hearts the way cow-punk often does. While those hit albums (Leftoverture and Point of No Return) leave behind the middle American naivety that lends “Son for America” sweet natured charm, even at the height of their commercial success Kansas was distinguished by ambition ideas far beyond the eventual execution (as Leftoverture‘s “Magnus Opus” proves).

“Song for America” establishes several Kansas conventions that would be more successfully applied in subsequent albums: extensive keyboard noodling (piano, organ and moog), ensemble vocals and a forced fiddle part that seems out of place. Still unabashedly midwestern, Kansas celebrates this great nation by stretching to just shy of ten minutes what was already over-long at three. While their hit albums (Leftoverture and Point of No Return) leave behind the middle American naivety that lends “Son

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“The Fall of the House of Usher” by the Alan Parsons Project

tales andThis epic instrumental by the Alan Parsons Project is likely to hold your attention about as long as Edgar Allen Poe’s short stories did when they were assigned to you in junior high school. “The Fall of the House of Usher” is actually the first realization of Claude Debussy’s two-act opera based on the 1839 story, unfinished at the time of his death. The French composer is not credited on the album, perhaps at the request of his estate.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Pictures at an Exhibition by Emerson Lake & Palmer

elp270s prog rock albums are littered with references to romantic-era composers, often landing their albums in our “Classical Gasp!” section. King Crimson’s Lizard includes a passage borrowed from Maurice Ravel, and the Alan Parsons Project track above is based on a work by Debussy. Few groups took the rock/classical hybrid to the extremes of Emerson Lake & Palmer, who had included a work by Bartok on their first album.

Pictures at an Exhibition (recorded before the release of their second album) was released at a budget price, which led to its substantial sales. Unlike many rock/classical hybrids, it’s fairly faithful to the original, an 1874 suite by Modest Mussorgsky. The highlight of the album is Keith Emerson’s performance of the opening “Promenade” on the fifty-year-old organ at Newcastle’s City Hall.

In fact, this album’s contribution to the oeuvre of mind-numblingly boring progressive rock is not its romantic reinventions, but the original material the trio adds to the program: a plodding “Blues Variation” by Emerson (heard below) and a dreadful ballad, “The Sage,” by Greg Lake.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Any record by Starcastle

fountains of lightIllinois’ answer to Yes .. seems the world’s answer was a resounding no. This band was given every opportunity — Queen’s producer Roy Thomas Baker recorded Fountains of Light, their second album, and Epic set them up with opening gigs on tours by Boston, Journey and Foreigner. Audiences simply weren’t enchanted by what sounds distinctly derivative, like a K-Tel Records version of Yes.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Act II of Joe’s Garage by Frank Zappa

joes garageThe thing that makes most post-Mothers Zappa albums so boring is their uninhibited indulgence. He created a world in which he could compose, conduct and record entirely without criticism by eliminating anyone with the courage to call the emperor on his nakedness.

Joe’s Garage was split into two releases but in its staggering excess the second was a double LP, adding an entire act to a story that, like Debussy’s unfinished opera, was overextended before the first curtain fell. The epic nature of Zappa’s concept album was ensured by the establishment of his own imprint (Zappa Records, what else?) earlier in 1979 after a length legal battle with Warner Brothers.

Like the first record issued by Zappa’s new label (Sheik Yerbouti), Joe’s Garage is characterized by juvenile humor (One of Act I’s high points is “Why Does it Hurt when I Pee?”) and long arrangements built out of spliced Zappa guitar solos. As a concept album its forced together by intrusive appearances of the Central Scrutinizer, a bitter government employee whose eventual conclusion, “Who gives a fuck anyway?” is both hilarious and ironically fitting. Act I contains the genuine, fun title track and Act III winds down with “Watermelon in Easter Hay,” Zappa’s most sensitive and moving instrumental work.

In between the story falls apart (Joe is aparently getting a blowjob from a robot in the track below) and the music goes with it. Were the first and third acts issued as a double LP they might be as passionately praised by prog-fans as other contemporaneous concept albums like The Wall. Instead Act II is just that shitty record you have to buy to hear “Watermelon in Easter Hay.”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Realistically, we can’t keep this up, so here’s one last feature on bands with a song that is their name — this one is for the ferroequinologists out there.

von ryans express

People have been writing songs that imitate the sound of trains for as long as there have been trains — there are so many awesome train songs (and even whole albums about trains) that the subject demands its own post in the future.

Von Ryan’s Express was presumably not named for the 1965 Frank Sinatra film, memorable for its railroad heist and exciting escape — one mysterious Von Ryan is credited as “bandleader” on the jacket. His act is effusively praised in the notes on the back (“really making its presence felt .. from TOKYO to LAS VEGAS” / “After you listen to this album, you will agree with me … these guys are FANTASTIC.”) but so far as we can tell their only other recording was a 7″ single on Sanns Records, a Chicago label.

Maybe they were too far ahead of their time, or maybe too often mistaken for the Frank Sinatra film. The album is all we have to hear from them — it opens and closes with “Von Ryan’s Express.”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Von Ryan’s Express no 1″

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Von Ryan’s Express no 2″

The flip of this local split single has already been posted on the blog — jump in the Wayback Machine to travel back to 2011 and hear “Sea Legs” by Dragons Power Up! by clicking here (and they are, by the way, playing an unexpected “last show” in March, so you may wish for a “Wayforward” machine too).

dragons puppies

But we have until now neglected the awesome song by Puppies and Trains on the other side. While not officially a “band with a song that is their name” we’re including them because we have a soft spot for this song.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Behold a Pale Puppy”

shoutAnd now we finally leave the theme of bands with a song that is their name by hopping aboard the BT Express. Originally called the Brooklyn Trucking Express, this awesome party band took on more of a railroad theme after shortening their name. Their big hit was “Do It (‘Til You’re Satisfied)” and on the album cover they were seen hanging out at the train station. Unfortunately, we didn’t have that one in the record shop this week. The album also included “Express,” the first of the two songs you have to hear to get their whole name.

They were super successful in the seventies, releasing several top-charting albums. About five years later they finally gave us the rest of their name in song for with “Ride on BT” on Shout!

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Ride on BT”

DSC03608

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Mandrill” by Mandrill

“Mandrill” is the first song on Mandrill, by Mandrill. It’s their first album. This awesome band had a successful run in the middle 70s, but you hardly see their records anymore (we often order reissues of this and of the following two albums, however, and highly recommend all three). They are probably more familiar to folks today as sampling fodder for everyone from Public Enemy (“By the Time I Get to Arizona”) to Kanye West (“Two Words”).

Mandrills are members of the Old World Family of primates (the Cercopithecidae), and live mostly in tropical rain forests. They live in communities called “hordes” and are the worlds largest monkeys.

Charles Darwin described them in The Descent of Man: “No other member in the whole class of mammals is coloured in so extraordinary a manner as the adult male mandrills.”

DSC06472-295x300

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Exotik A-GoGo” by Exotik A-GoGo

We picked Exotik-A-Gogo‘s Go Ape as one of our favorite local albums of 2011 (posted here). If you find yourself entranced by their hypnotic blend of island rhythms and jazz, we suggest you go to Psycho Suzi’s Motor Lounge this weekend and see them perform — they play there every Friday and Saturday night.

a2248105207_2

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“As it Is” by As it Is

This is a fine song by a local band that once played here in the shop shortly after releasing this disc, Jump. You can hear it all on their Bandcamp page here if you enjoy this one.

a1116607729_10

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Pennyroyal” by Pennyroyal

An album we picked as our favorite of 2013 just last month (and reviewed here), Baby I’m Against It has so many good songs that we haven’t even posted this gem yet. “Pennyroyal” has a driving honkytonk rhythm and one of Angie Oase’s best performances on the album.

Pennyroyal, Mentha pulegium, is a flowering plant with a strong minty scent. It is dangerously toxic, but not regulated by the FDA. There are a number of cases of women dying after ingesting its essential oil to cause an abortion. It is described as a natural birth control in Tom Robbins’ novel, Jitterbug Perfume, but is just one of many of his misunderstandings of female health and anatomy.

DSC03609

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Fancy” by Fancy

Not their fanciest song, but fun nonetheless. Lead singer Helen Caunt was Penthouse‘s Pet of the Month in October 1971, a few years before Fancy’s first album was recorded (and she looked very fancy).

Tune in tomorrow for a few more bands with songs that are their name!

This was actually kind of difficult to compile – Elvis starred in an unbelievable 33 films, singing an average of ten songs in each. If Hymie’s would just get the intern I’ve been asking for I could have given that person the job of sifting through all of the soundtrack albums for the turkiest of the turkeys. Instead I had to do it myself.

(10) “Yoga Is As Yoga Does” from Easy Come, Easy Go

Funny, when you consider Elvis’ enthusiasm for karate in the early 70s (He studied with Memphis master Kang Rhee for four years). Funnier because its Elvis doing yoga.

(9) “Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce” from Girl Happy

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


I think if you interviewed a dozen people leaving the theater at the end of this movie, nine of them would have forgotten the plot already. Even by beach party movie standards Girl Happy is pretty stupid. Its almost stupid by Elvis movie standards, but actually there it ranks pretty well.

(8) “Ito Eats” from Blue Hawaii

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


There’s really not a lot I can add to this.

Okay, I can’t keep my mouth shut any more than Ito can stop eating – Here’s the liberation anthem of fat Hawaiian guys, seldom heard at their marches because bongo drums and ukuleles are too much work to carry around. Usually its just performed acappella around a spit.

(7 & 6) “Poison Ivy League” and “Carny Town” from Roustabout

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Roustabout is my favorite Elvis movie. First he’s cruising around on his motorcycle after getting fired for fighting with fancy college boys and then he’s invited to join a traveling carnival run by Barbara Stanwyck. The problem is the songs in Roustabout are some of the very worst. I don’t think there’s going to be a lot of debate over including “Poison Ivy League” on a list of the worst Elvis movie songs, but “Carny Town” is included as a bonus because I think it could be a great punk rock anthem if played by the right group. I’d like to hear Dillinger Four take “Carny Town” on with the same fanaticism they gave to “Sally MacLennane”.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Okay, “Hard Knocks” is also included. The songs in Roustabout are really bad! The thing about “Hard Knocks” is that Elvis really could sing the blues. He also hard a hard life. People who thumb their noses at Elvis’ 1969 hit “In the Ghetto” usually don’t understand that he grew up in rural poverty which is sometimes a lot worse than urban poverty. “Hard Knocks”, on the other hand, is about the least soulful song about tough times I have ever heard. What’s really ridiculous is that songwriter Joy Byer’s husband later asserted he wrote the songs from Elvis movies credited to her (At least 10 by my count). Who would want to claim this song?

(5) “Signs of the Zodiac from The Trouble with Girls

If you were a kid and you really liked rock and roll, and you rented a few of these movies (Remember renting movies?), you got a pretty askew view of the world. Between Elvis movie and Douglas Adams books its a wonder I grew into somebody who could succeed at all.

(4) “Song of the Shrimp” from Girls! Girls! Girls!

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Girls! Girls! Girls! includes Elvis’ only genuine sea chanty (“Thanks to the Rolling Sea”) and some irresistibly funny tracks when revisited today (“I’d Rather Be Tied” and “We’re Coming in Loaded”) but the goofiest song is “Song of the Shrimp”. In a lot of ways the Elvis movie soundtracks are charmingly naive little vignettes, and Girls! Girls! Girls! is a great example – In this case our little look at Ross Carpenter’s life is a lot of fun even if the songs he sing aren’t.

(3) “The Bullfighter Was A Lady” from Fun in Acapulco

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


The next track is “There’s No Room to Rhumba in a Sports Car”, which nearly made it onto this list. Fun in Acapulco is fun movie and makes for a lively soundtrack, but it has the feeling of wasted potential. If Elvis had followed Edyie Gorme and made an album in Spanish it would probably be his most popular record today.

Okay, so I might as well tell you the truth: If I made a list of my 10 favorite Elvis movie songs it probably wouldn’t be any different. Sure, I love “GI Blues” and really everything from Loving You, but those are great songs. I don’t love them the same way I love these ten tracks.

You’re either going to love Elvis or you’re not, and nothing I can write is going to change your mind. Not going to love Elvis? Well, nuts to you. That’s right. Nuts to you.

(2) “Go East Young Man” from Harum Scarum

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The most difficult thing about compiling this list was finding nine songs worst than everything on the soundtrack to Harum Scarum, which is also the very worst of the Elvis movies. Elvis is kidnapped while touring the mideast and forced to assassinate a sheik. Hilarity ensues.

(1) “Dominic” from Stay Away Joe

So far as I can tell the songs in this movie were so bad they never bothered to makde a soundtrack album. I can’t say because this is one of the few Elvis movies I haven’t seen (Did I tell you there are 33 of them?) and I’m not going to watch it now, even for your benefit. There’s just too much else to do.

I have no idea what’s going on in this scene but I really like it.

Actually, we couldn’t really find very many sequel songs in our collection of Christmas records. This one by Homer & Jethro gives us an idea what happened next after Mommy was kissing Santa Claus in another song:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Santy’s Movin’ On” by Homer & Jethro

And we found a sequel to one of our favorite Christmas classics, “Santa Baby” by the incomparably Eartha Kitt. She recorded a sequel, “This Year’s Santa Baby,” the following year (1954). She also recorded the novelty number “Nuttin’ for Christmas” a couple years later.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Santa Baby” by Eartha Kitt

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“This Year’s Santa Baby” by Eartha Kitt
this years santa baby

secret stash singlesOne thing that has been really fun about Secret Stash Records, the local label that’s based here on the awesome-est street in the city, is that they’ve been making new 45s! We’re never going to get tired of digging through boxes of mixed up old 45s around here, but there’s something really fun about a new single!

A few other people in town have been doing it, too — it’s a trend that we welcome with open arms!

Here’s a sample from our incomplete collection of the Secret Stash singles. Some are new songs and some are re-issued or never-been-released classic tracks:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Sugar Man” by Sonny Knight & the Lakers, who just wrapped up a great residency at the Eagles Club here in our neighborhood.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Fell in Love” by Oscar Wright, from a bonus 45 that came with the Free Angela LP out earlier this year. This song was split into two tracks, sorry (oops).

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“Big Muffler” by Black Market Brass, an awesome new afro-beat band. This is one of the best things Secret Stash has released — in fact, this is one of those records we can play the “Beta Band” trick with when the shop is busy (what’s this?).

Their reissue of George Jones’ first album also came with a single, we just haven’t convinced anybody to bring a copy back in so we could record it for this post. There is also a second Valdons single we’re pretty excited to hear (You might remember they had two great songs on the Twin Cities Funk & Soul compilation). Yay for new 45s!

« Older entries § Newer entries »

This site is protected by Comment SPAM Wiper.