Photos

You are currently browsing the archive for the Photos category.

sonny stitt burnin

fuse

southwind what a place to land

dynomite!

big noise from winnetka

fireworks billy mure

Did you ever get the impression that Herbie Mann was the first guy at the picnic to take his shirt off?

DSC07897DSC07898DSC07899DSC07896

 

atlantis in hi fi yodeling in hi fikentonDSCN0706guy lombardo

hi fi harp

mr bongos in hi fi sarah vaugh in hi fi

tango-in-hi-fihi-fi-harphi-fi-harp-ruth-welcome

polkas-in-hi-fi pipe-organ-in-hi-fi

morton-gould-hi-fi wayne-king-hi-fi

 

This is a rerun of a post from 2014, when Gus and Dave a lego model of the record store. The kids are home for spring break here in Minneapolis this week, and we talked about trying to re-build the model, but the consensus was that we’d have to disassemble too many other amazing creations to free up all the blocks.

photo 1

lego hymies 2 lego hymies 3 lego hymies 4 lego hymies 6

lego hymies

lego hymies 5

Whenever a performing artist passes away, there is a rush of interest in their music. Fans flood stores looking for a favorite album or their most recent album, suddenly making a mediocre record a best-seller (let’s call this “the Double Fantasy effect”). Its a phenomenon that may be as old as record stardom — Enrico Caruso continued to enjoy commercial success long after his passing with new recordings still making news into the late 30s.

Presently the treatment of unissued recordings is a central issue in the settlement of Prince’s estate. We have mixed feelings on the subject. As fans we’re eager to hear more recordings, but also as fans we respect that he may have chosen to set the recordings aside for a reason.

This past weekend we were listening to Marvin Gaye albums, including the first two which were released after he was murdered in April 1984. Some good songs came out on the albums. One of the best of these was “The World Is Rated X,” which appeared on the Motown Remembers Marvin Gaye LP but was first recorded for his ‘lost’ 1972 album You’re the Man.

Columbia Records, with whom Gaye had signed after his tumultuous split from Motown, and to whom he’d delivered the enormously successful Midnight Love in 1982, was first to capitalize on his passing with an album of unissued recordings. The album Dream of a Lifetime collected unissued material and contained the hit “Sanctified Lady,” partly covering Gaye’s debts at the time of his death. Motown’s album followed the next year and included material from as early as 1963. Many of the early recordings on Motown Remembers Marvin Gaye were overdubbed to feature a more contemporary drum sound (the so-called “fat snare’ sound of the era) and new backing vocals.

The back cover of the Motown album always resembled, to us, one of those posterboard displays at a funeral. He is seen leaning on a car, in a kimono and — for some reason — eating breakfast in bed.

Monday’s snowstorm was the biggest here in Minneapolis since 2012. We were thrilled to have a snow day and spend it romping outside with our kids, except that there was also a lot of shoveling to do. Even Irene took the day off yesterday, which is very rare.

We haven’t had the snow piled so high on the sides of our shop since that 2012 snowstorm, and unfortunately the parking spaces on Lake Street haven’t been plowed very well. We’re hoping that improves today, but if not we’ll have to get out there and shovel some more.

Today’s main feature is a couple songs by South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela, who passed away this week at the age of seventy-eight.

Although he spent many years away from his homeland, Masekela’s music is indelibly marked by South Africa. He was twenty-one when he left in 1960, in part because being an anti-apartheid activist made him a target. He finally returned in 1990, after Nelson Mandela had been freed.

Masekela’s song “Bring Him Back Home” was a hit in 1987 and became an anthem of the anti-apartheid movement.

Masakela also had several pop hits in the U.S., notably the 1968 cowbell jam “Grazing in the Grass.” He recorded two hugely successful albums with Herb Alpert and also had a dance hit from his 1984 album Techno Bush. Our favorite of his nearly fifty albums is Introducing the Hedzoleh Soundz, the first of three albums he recorded with that group in Lagos, Nigeria during the middle 70s. Here are the first two tracks from that record, called “Languta” and “Kaa Ye Oya.” Masakela wrote the first song and members of Hedzoleh Soundz wrote the second.

« Older entries

This site is protected by Comment SPAM Wiper.