Awesome-ness!

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Our ninth annual block party for Record Store Day is Saturday April 13th! We’ll have special limited edition releases inside the shop, and the big attraction will once again be on 39th Avenue. Welcome spring with delicious burgers, burritos and brews at Peppers & Fries, while enjoying some of our favorite local artists.

Live music on 39th Avenue performed by

Gabe Barnett and them Rounders

The Southside Aces

Pleasure Horse

Little Fevers

Mina Moore

Toki Wright & Big Cats

Set times will be here on the website in April, along with more details about the Record Store Day releases. A special thanks to this year’s sponsors, Windsor and Fulton Brewing! Hope to see a lot of familiar faces for one of the funnest days of the year!

horizon singers

spotlight on percussion

This entertaining program was produced and directed by Ward Botsford for Vox Records in 1955, and appeared as box set even though it is a single LP. Spotlight on Percussion presents the sounds of more than sixty percussion instruments followed by examples of their use by classical composers ranging from Handel to Hindesmith with many stops in between.

The program is narrated by radio personality Al “Jazzbo” Collins (who last appeared on the Hymies blog here), and features Arnold Goldberg and Kenny Clarke as the percussionists. The album also includes an interesting interview with the engineer, Rudy Van Gelder, best known for his work with jazz artists, including on some of the recordings for which Clarke is famous.

Ward Botsford had an extensive career as a record producer with a keen emphasis on obscure or unrecorded classical compositions. He also produced spoken word albums for Caedmon Records, recording writers such as T.S. Elliot and Gertrude Stein reading their own works. Beginning in 1979 he had the opportunity to reissue music from EMI’s catalog through Arabesque Records, a subsidiary of Caedmon until Botsford and a partner purchased it. After Botsford’s retirement the label went further into jazz, but still includes new and reissued classical recordings as well.

Here are two selections from the program of Spotlight on Percussion.

The first offers insight into the role of percussion in several places, such as unprecedented appearance of the tympani in the D minor scherzo in Beethoven’s 9th Symphony and the brilliant use in Saint-Saen’s Dance Macabre. This second launching the tradition of dancing skeletons, from Disney’s “Silly Symphony” in 1929 to Michael Jackson’s “Ghosts” seventy years later.

In the second section Kenny Clarke performs a variety of material while Collins introduces the percussionist’s role in a jazz group. He was, even by 1955, one of the most influential performers in jazz, for his role in early bebop recordings by Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk and others. Clarke is credited with creating the ride cymbal pattern, which became a foundation of bop rhythm (here’s Tony Williams performing an example of the ride cymbal). You’ll hear this and other familiar bebop innovations in his improvisations on this recording.

nifty chart

The final feature of Spotlight on Percussion is the big book included in the box, which contains an extensive and interesting history of percussion. There is even this nifty chart of instruments and their use, range and history.

distins drum

The history includes fun trivia, like the story of Distin’s Monster Drum, exhibited in England in the nineteenth century. The book also includes more details about the recording and production of the record than you’ll find in any other record (except maybe one recorded for Dave and Sylvia Ray’s Sweet Jane label), and even pictures of Rudy Van Gelder cutting the master to disc.



Thursday night at the Cedar Cultural Center we’ll celebrate the the latest release on our in-house record label (Hymie’s Records, of course!) — six new songs by ragtime pickin’ blues singer Lonesome Dan Kase!

Hours Seem Like Days looks at the world and the passage of time through the eyes of shelter animals. Part Piedmont part Delta, the 10″ record features some of the finest playing Lonesome Dan has ever recorded, and gorgeous artwork by Shelley Rohlf.

songs to grow on

Woody Guthrie recorded his children’s records for Folkways (Songs to Grow On and Nursery Days) in the late 40s when his own children were fairly small. During this time he lived in the now-famous Mermaid Avenue house on Coney Island, and produced a variety of songs, poems and drawing now archived by his family.

You could learn more about the archives from the official Woody Guthrie website.

While much of his work in these years was inspired by his domestic life in New York, he continued to document the struggles of working people — for instance, in 1948 he wrote on of our favorites of his songs, “Deportees (Plane Wreck at Los Gatos)” after reading about the death of 28 migrant workers who were being sent back to Mexico.

It may not be the coolest choice but “Car Song” is probably our favorite song by Woody Guthrie. Why don’t they make cars with horns that go “Ah-ooo-gah!” anymore?

 

The same day we posted Lenny Bruce’s “Djinni in the Candy Store” last month, we came across this album while cleaning a great¬†crate of jazz records.

bobby lyle

Keyboardist Bobby Lyle has made his most indelible¬†mark as the musical director for hugely popular singers in the 80s — Bette Midler, Anita Baker and Al Jarreau — but he has sporadically recorded soulful jazz albums under his own name as well.

He is also part of the Minnesota jazz legacy, growing up just a couple blocks off Lake Street and cutting his teeth at clubs like the Blue Note and Herb’s back in the sixties. Jay Goetting’s history of Minnesota jazz, Joined at the Hip, includes an impressive story about Lyle. When Wynton Kelly was playing at Herb’s with his trio, Lyle stepped up and played during their smoke break. Mickey McClain was there, and remembered, “Kelly looked up and exclaimed, ‘Who the fuck is that?'”

Another legend about Lyle is that he nearly started a jazz fusion band with Jimi Hendrix. The two jammed, along with Willie Weeks and Gypsy drummer Bill Lordan, but the project never went further before Hendrix passed away the following year.

Lyle lives in Texas now, but according to Goetting’s book he occasionally returns to the Twin Cities.

According to Wikipedia, the Ramones performed more than 2,200 times. One of us attended one of those performances, not an impressive boast but a warmly held memory nonetheless.

We count ten “Hey Ho, Let’s Go”s in the album version of “Blitzkrieg Bop,” and the Ramones weren’t famous for changing things around in their live sets — so it’s entirely possible that Johnny Ramone sang that line more than 22,000 times.

Anyway, ten of those times are caught on this live album that was released last week.

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